Sincerely, Science
18 April 2014 @ 10:44 PM
Anonymous asked: "I think ure really pretty n really smart n u seem like such a great person amd i just????? wow"

You are so so so sweet. This means a lot and definitely brightened my night a little :)

10 hours ago
18 April 2014 @ 10:36 PM
Anonymous asked: "Something secretly that I think? That you're lucky to be able to get into working for a space program much more easily that I can Eeenvyyy"

I’m sure you can too, if its a dream you have you can work towards it!

10 hours ago
18 April 2014 @ 9:21 PM
12 hours ago via sonsofsauron (originally blindspotsandsunshine-deactivat)
18 April 2014 @ 9:26 AM

huffpostscience:

These MRI images of fruit, vegetables and plants will change how you look at food forever. Find out what each of these MRI scans are here.

(Constructed by MRI technologist Andy Ellison at Boston University Medical School)

1 day ago via huffingtonpost (originally huffpostscience)
18 April 2014 @ 9:00 AM
1 day ago via daftpunkforthesoul (originally popstronomy)
18 April 2014 @ 8:34 AM
congregated:

Vertical&Vintage Blog
1 day ago via congregated (originally nowheresviille)
18 April 2014 @ 8:09 AM

astrodidact:

Published April 17th, 2014

NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope has discovered the first validated Earth-size planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a distant star, an area where liquid water might exist on its surface.

The planet, Kepler-186f, is ten percent larger in size than Earth and orbits its parent star, Kepler-186, every 130 days. The star, located about 500 light-years from Earth, is classified as an M1 dwarf and is half the size and mass of our sun.

For more information about this discovery, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/kepler
For more information about NASA Ames, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/ames

1 day ago via nerdragermusings (originally astrodidact)
18 April 2014 @ 7:43 AM

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey

(Source: yesknopemaybe)

1 day ago via freshphotons (originally yesknopemaybe)
18 April 2014 @ 7:17 AM
melodiebenford:

laboratoryequipment:

Laser Uncovers ‘Quantum Droplet’ in SemiconductorJILA physicists used an ultrafast laser and help from German theorists to discover a new semiconductor quasiparticle — a handful of smaller particles that briefly condense into a liquid-like droplet.Quasiparticles are composites of smaller particles that can be created inside solid materials and act together in a predictable way. A simple example is the exciton, a pairing, due to electrostatic forces, of an electron and a so-called “hole,” a place in the material’s energy structure where an electron could be, but isn’t.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/laser-uncovers-%E2%80%98quantum-droplet%E2%80%99-semiconductor

I love me a good, ole quasi-particle!

melodiebenford:

laboratoryequipment:

Laser Uncovers ‘Quantum Droplet’ in Semiconductor

JILA physicists used an ultrafast laser and help from German theorists to discover a new semiconductor quasiparticle — a handful of smaller particles that briefly condense into a liquid-like droplet.

Quasiparticles are composites of smaller particles that can be created inside solid materials and act together in a predictable way. A simple example is the exciton, a pairing, due to electrostatic forces, of an electron and a so-called “hole,” a place in the material’s energy structure where an electron could be, but isn’t.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/02/laser-uncovers-%E2%80%98quantum-droplet%E2%80%99-semiconductor

I love me a good, ole quasi-particle!

1 day ago via the-science-of-time (originally laboratoryequipment)
18 April 2014 @ 6:51 AM

txchnologist:

image

by Marsha Lewis, Inside Science TV

It starts with a mosquito bite and can end in severe sickness and even death. Malaria claims the lives of more than one million people worldwide each year.

Spotting the disease is the first step toward treating it, but the current way to detect malaria is costly, time consuming and not very accurate.

“The people [who] were examining samples for malaria were having such a hard time getting the right answer. They were only right about half the time,” said Brian Grimberg, a biologist at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio.

Read More

1 day ago via the-science-of-time (originally txchnologist)